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Front Side: Delaware & Hudson Railroad Back Side: Delaware & Hudson Railroad D&H R.R. Flag

Delaware & Hudson Railroad

Item: 3-D     Price: $60.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Forged by the Slaymaker Co.
Superb serif lettering and copper patina.
Given the moniker, "Delay and Hesitate."

History

Nicknamed "The Bridge Line to New England and Canada," the D&H helped connect New York with Montreal, Quebec and New England. The D&H roots go way back to 1823. In 1829, D&H purchased four locomotives built in England. One of them, the Stourbridge Lion, was the first steam locomotive to run on rails in America, but proved too heavy for D&H's wood track.The four locomotives were set aside and gradually deteriorated. Similar to the B&O's situation, changing times brought hardships to the railroad in the 1960's and 70's. Talk about a deal; the D&H reached its nadir on January 4, 1984 when it was purchased by Timothy Mellon's Guilford Transportation Industries (GTI), from Norfolk & Western Railroad for just $500,000.

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Front Side: Delaware & Hudson Railroad Back Side: Delaware & Hudson Railroad D&H engine No. 1403

Delaware & Hudson Railroad

Item: 4-D     Price: $50.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Fraim forged.
Superb serif lettering and fine pocket wear.
Backward "D" forged intentially.

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Front Side: Dayton & Western Railroad Back Side: Delaware Otsego System Railroad D&W car No.165

Dayton & Western

Item: 5-D     Price: $175.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Superb stamp marks and patina.Today, the D&W Railroad
is a shortline railroad operated by the Iowa Northern Railway.

History

The Dayton & Western Traction Company (D&W) was an interurban electric freight and passenger railroad operating in the states of Ohio and Indiana. It had a main line extending from Dayton, Ohio west to Richmond, Indiana; 38 miles, where it connected to the Terre Haute Indianapolis & Eastern for joint operations of interurban trains between Dayton and Indianapolis; a total of 108 miles. .

The D&W was an important connection between the traction systems of Ohio and Indiana and was sought after by some of the larger traction companies during its career. It had express train service including parlor cars on its name trains, the "Buckeye Special" and the "Hoosier" during the 20's and had a modestly heavy schedule of trains into the early 30's before declining traffic forced its closure in 1937.

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Front Side: Delaware Otsego System Railroad Back Side: Delaware Otsego System Railroad DOS R.R. Flag

Delaware Otsego System

Item: 6-D     Price: $35.00

Remarks: ca. late 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Block lettering and nice gold patina.

History

The Delaware Otsego Corporation (DO) is an American railway holding company which owns the subsidiary New York-Susquehanna & Western Railway as well as other, smaller branch line railroads, collectively known as the DO System. It is headquartered in Cooperstown, New York in Otsego County. Once known for operating a successful family of short line railroads throughout New York and New Jersey, the only remaining active operation is the New York-Susquehanna & Western and its leased lines now known as the Central New York Railroad.

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Front Side: Des Moines Railway Back Side: Des Moines Railway Des Moines St. Ry

Des Moines Railway

Item: 7-D     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Excellent serif lettering.
Great pocket wear and superb gold patina. Interurban line.

History

Horse drawn passenger vehicles appeared in the larger cities in the early 19th century. However, the poor condition of the streets meant a slow bumpy ride, or the prospect of becoming mired in the mud. Iron tracks were built to help alleviate this problem, reducing the number of horses needed and permitting a somewhat smoother and faster ride. Speeds of four to six miles per hour were possible, hardly more thean the pace of walking. A substantial part of the total costs was that of the horse, often priced at $100 or more and because they were usually limited to 4-6 hours of work, several teams were necessary. Often, the costs of the horses was greater than the average cost of $750 for the car. It was estimated, that 40% of the total investment was in the horses and stable.

The capital of Iowa had a population of about 10,000 people at the close of the Civil War. Dr. M. P. Turner, Aho had operated toll bridges over the DesMoines River until tolls were abolished by the city council, received the first franchise for a narrow gauge horsecar line to run from the Polk County Courthouse to the foot of Capitol Hill. In 1878, rails were laid on Walnut Street and ten years later, a line was opened on Fourth Street. Electric power was introduced by the Broad Gauge Railway Company, organized by Messrs. Van Ginkel, Teachout and Weber in 1886, to operate on Locust Street and Grand Avenue. In 1889, Jefferson Polk, an associate of Turner, acquired control of the Independent lines and consolidated them into the Des MoInes Street Railway.

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Front Side:Dardanelle & Russellville Railroad Back Side: Dardanelle & Russellville Railroad Comedian Groucho Marx

Dardanelle & Russellville Railroad

Item: 8-D     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb block lettering and patina. Double digit serial#.

History

The line was initially chartered as the Dardanelle & Russellville Railway and train operations began in August 1883. After undergoing reorganization in 1900, operations continued as the Dardanelle & Russellville Railroad. When originally constructed, the railroad carried cotton and other agricultural products. The predominant traffic shifted to coal by 1900, thanks to extensive semi-anthracite coal production along the railroad. The D&R was also a leader in the trend for railroads to branch into other transportation modes, owning a highway subsidiary from 1919-1960. The highway subsidiary, Dardanelle Transfer Company, operated both bus and truck service over an expanded territory much larger than was served by the railroad itself. The current DR operates a 4.8 mile line in Arkansas from Russellville (where it interchanges with Union Pacific) to a point beside the Arkansas River, across from Dardanelle, Arkansas.

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Front Side: Delaware-Lackawanna & Western Railroad Back Side: Delaware-Lackawanna & Western Railroad DL&W R.R. Flag

Delaware-Lackawanna & Western Railroad

Item: 9-D     Price: $85.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Fraim forged.
Superb serif lettering and carmel patina.
Given the moniker, "Delay, Linger and Wait."

History

The Delaware-Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company (DL&W or Lackawanna Railroad) was a U.S. Class 1 railroad that connected Buffalo, New York, and Hoboken, New Jersey, a distance of about 400 miles. Incorporated in 1853, the DL&W was profitable during the first two decades of the twentieth century, but its margins were gradually hurt by declining traffic in coal, competition from trucks, and high New Jersey taxes. In 1960, the DL&W merged with rival Erie Railroad to form the Erie Lackawanna Railroad.

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Front Side: Delaware-Lackawanna & Western Railroad Back Side: Delaware-Lackawanna & Western Railroad Inspection locomotive

Delaware-Lackawanna & Western Railroad

Item: 9-D     New Listing     Price: $85.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Fraim forged.
Superb serif lettering and gold patina.

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Front Side: Detroit-Lansing & Northern Railroad Back Side: Detroit-Lansing & Northern Railroad PM R.R. Flag

Detroit-Lansing & Northern Railroad

Item: 11-D     Price: $175.00

Remarks: chartered in 1876. A relic!
Attractive serif lettering and superb patina.

History

The Detroit-Lansing & Northern Railroad (DL&N) is a defunct railroad which was formed on December 27, 1876 as a reorganization of the foreclosed Detroit-Lansing & Lake Michigan Railroad. The segment of its main line from Detroit to Lansing became an important component of the Pere Marquette Railroad, organized in 1900, and is still in use by CSX.

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Front Side: Detroit & Toledo Shore Line Railroad Back Side: Detroit & Toledo Shore Line Railroad D&TSL R.R. Flag

Detroit & Toledo Shore Line Railroad

Item: 12-D     Price: $245.00

Remarks: D&TSL was formed in 1898. Another beauty!
Superb serif lettering and gold patina.
Key most likely from the year 1898-99.

History

The Detroit and Toledo Shore Line Railroad (reporting mark DTS) is a historic railroad that operated in northwestern Ohio and southeastern Michigan.

The D&TSL was originally incorporated as the Toledo & Ottawa Beach Railway in Ohio and the Pleasant Bay Railway in Michigan. In March 1899 the two companies conveyed all their property to a new company incorporated under the Michigan law as the Detroit & Toledo Shore Line. The intent was to construct the railroad as a high speed interurban connecting link between the Lake Shore Electric at Toledo and interurban lines in Michigan. Immediately following the purchase of the right-of-way, they began the actual grading of the road and construction of the Ottawa River bridge just north of Toledo.

The D&TSL operated 46.98 miles (75.61 km) of line between Toledo, Ohio, and Detroit, Michigan, a bridge route connecting the Motor City with the rail gateway of Toledo. Prior to the 1960s mergers resulting in Penn Central Transportation and the Norfolk and Western Railway, the link between these two cities was vitally important to the independent railroads in the area, particularly the GTW and the Nickel Plate. In 1960 it reported 243 million net ton-miles of revenue freight.

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Front Side: Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad Back Side: Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad D&RG R.R. Flag

Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad

Item: 14-D     Price: $75.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Attractive block lettering and gold patina.
Given the moniker, "Dangerous & Rapidly Getting Worse."

History

The railroad started as a 3 ft. narrow gauge line running south from Denver, Colorado in 1870. It served mainly as a transcontinental bridge line between Denver, and Salt Lake City, Utah. The Rio Grande was the epitome of mountain railroading, with a motto of "Through the Rockies", not around them and later "Main line through the Rockies", both referring to the Rocky Mountains. The D&RGW operated the highest mainline rail line in the United States, over the 10,240 feet Tennessee Pass in Colorado, and the famed routes through the Moffat Tunnel and the Royal Gorge. At its height, around 1890, the D&RG had the largest operating narrow gauge railroad network in North America. Known for its independence, the D&RGW operated the last private intercity passenger train in the United States, the "Rio Grande Zephyr."

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Front Side: Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad Back Side: Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad Roundhouse crash at Minturn    D&RGW observation car

Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad

Item: 15-D     Price: $85.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Slaymaker forged.
Attractive serif lettering and superb gold patina.

History - continued from above

In 1988, the Rio Grande's parent corporation, Rio Grande Industries, purchased Southern Pacific Transportation Company and as the result of a merger, the larger Southern Pacific Railroad name was chosen for identity. Today, most former D&RGW main lines are owned and operated by the Union Pacific Railroad; several branch lines are now operated as heritage railways by various companies.

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Front Side: Denver & Salt Lake Railroad Back Side: Denver & Salt Lake Railroad D&SL R.R. Flag

Denver & Salt Lake Railroad

Item: 16-D     Price: $95.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Attractive block lettering and nice carmel patina.
Key has a Denver-Northwestern & Pacific style bit.

History

The Denver-Northwestern & Pacific Railway was a U.S. railroad company in Colorado. The company had numerous reorganizations throughout its financially troubled history, and later had the official names of the Denver & Salt Lake Railroad, and finally the Denver & Salt Lake Railway (reporting mark D&SL). By the time the company was acquired by the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad it was colloquially known as the Moffat Tunnel Route. The portions still in use today are known as the Moffat Tunnel Subdivision of Union Pacific Railroad's Central Corridor.

Prior to the line's construction there was no direct line west of Denver, with rail traffic having to detour south to Pueblo or north to Cheyenne. The Denver business community wanted an "Air Line" west of the city, and the Denver-Northwestern & Pacific Railway was going to be that Air Line, originating in Denver, and was planned to terminate in Salt Lake City, Utah. Although the line was never completed as a separate route to Salt Lake City, the finished portion was eventually connected with the D&RGW's main near Dotsero and used to shorten their route between Salt Lake City and Denver. The line initially featured an arduous grade over Rollins Pass, until the pass was bypassed by the Moffat Tunnel.

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Front Side: Detroit Edison Co. Back Side: Detroit Edison Co. Detroit Edison coal train

Detroit Edison Co.

Item: 17-D     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. early 1900's. Fraim Forged.
Nice block lettering and patina.

History

Detroit Edison was part of a large holding company called North American Edison Company. North American's stock had once been one of the twelve component stocks of the May 1896 original Dow Jones Industrial Average. North American Company was broken up by the Securities and Exchange Commission, following the United States Supreme Court decision of April 1, 1946.

Purchasing EMD SD40's and GE U30C's for mainline motive power as well as High-Side Articulated Gondolas (with a capacity of 185,000 pounds), this new equipment allowed Detroit Edison to move more coal en masse than what Penn Central was able to do with their equipment. The trains were maintained by Detroit Edison officials but operated by Penn Central crews.

By the late 1980s or early 1990, Detroit Edison discontinued use of their equipment,
as Conrail began to supply enough locomotives and rolling stock to meet the power company's needs.

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Front Side: Detroit-Grand Haven & Milwaukee Railway Back Side: Detroit-Grand Haven & Milwaukee Railway DGH&M R.R. Flag

Detroit-Grand Haven & Milwaukee Railway

Item: 18-D     Price: $345.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800's. Superb stamp marks and patina.
Attractive tapered barrel and double accent rings.
Double digit serial #. A rare 1!

History

The Detroit-Grand Haven & Milwaukee Railway is a defunct railroad which operated in the US state of Michigan during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
Itself the product of several consolidations in the 1870s, it became part of the Grand Trunk Western Railroad in 1928.

The DGH&M was formed from the ruin of Detroit and Milwaukee Railroad, a successor road to the Detroit and Pontiac Railroad, one of the first roads organized in the state of Michigan. The Great Western Railway, a Canadian company, had taken financial control of the D&M in 1860 after it defaulted on debt payments. The D&M entered receivership in 1875; in 1878 Great Western purchased it outright and refinanced the debts. The reorganized company bore the name Detroit, Grand Haven & Milwaukee Railway. Its Grand Rapids, Michigan station was located at the corner of Plainfield and East Leonard.

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Front Side: Detroit & Mackinac Railway Back Side: Detroit & Mackinac Railway D&M engine No.1280

Detroit & Mackinac Railway

Item: 19-D     Price: $50.00

Remarks: ca. late 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Not the standard D&M switch key.
Possible Lake State Railway style cut.

History

The Detroit and Mackinac Railway (reporting marks D&M, DM), informally known as the "Turtle Line," was a railroad in the northeastern
part of the Lower Peninsula of the U.S. state of Michigan. The main line ran from Bay City north to Cheboygan; it operated from 1894 to 1992.

In March 1976, the Detroit & Mackinac acquired a combination of trackage and operating trackage rights from the remains of the bankrupt Penn Central that created an alternate main line from Bay City northward, through Gaylord and Cheboygan, to Mackinaw City. However, adverse economic conditions continued to affect railroad operations in the northeastern United States. The road was sold to the Lake State Railway in 1992, and ended its existence as an independent railroad.

The Detroit & Mackinac called itself the "Turtle Line" and its logo symbol was "Mackinac Mac." The railroad bore the hostile backronym of "Defeated & Maltreated."

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Front Side: Detroit Terminal Railroad Back Side: Detroit Terminal Railroad DT R.R. Flag    DT engine No.105

Detroit Terminal Railroad

Item: 21-D     Price: $55.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Block lettering and nice carmel patina.

History

Detroit Terminal Railroad Company was incorporated in the State of Michigan, United States of America, on December 7, 1905 to own railroad track forming a semi-circle around the City of Detroit. It existed as a railroad until it was merged into its parent company, Consolidated Rail Corp., on May 31, 1984.

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Front Side: Des Moines Union Railway Back Side: Des Moines Union Railway DMU-bridge

Des Moines Union Railway

Item: 22-D     Price: $115.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Attractive block lettering and gold patina. Iowa short line.

History

Incorporated December 10, 1884, under the general laws of the State of Iowa, for the purpose of owning and operating a railway in, around, and about the city of Des Moines, Iowa. Its incorporation was the result of an agreement dated January 2, 1882, between the Des Moines and St. Louis Railroad Company, the Des Moines Northwestern Railway Company, the St. Louis, Des Moines and Northern Railway Company, and certain individuals.

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Front Side: Donora Southern Railroad Back Side: Donora Southern Railroad Donora Southern R.R.    Donora Southern R.R.

Donora Southern Railroad

Item: 23-D     Price: $145.00

Remarks: chartered in 1902. Forged by the Fraim/Slaymaker Co.
Superb serif lettering and carmel patina.

History

The Donora Southern Railroad was once a short line owned by US Steel, which served the steel, wire and zinc mills in Donora, Pennsylvania. The line only stretched about 3 miles only serving the 3 industries on the river and interchanged with the Pennsylvania Railroad.

The Pennsylvania Railroad line brought raw materials into Donora and carried the finished products to all parts of the eastern United States. The Donora Southern Railroad, owned by the American Steel and Wire Company, operated exclusively within the mill on its own track system..

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Front Side: Duluth-Missabe & Iron Range Railroad Back Side: Duluth-Missabe & Iron Range Railroad DM&IR R.R. Flag

Duluth-Missabe & Iron Range Railroad

Item: 24-D     Price: $65.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb block lettering and patina.

History

The DM&IR was formed by the merger in 1937 of the Duluth-Missabe & Northern Railway (DM&N) and the Spirit Lake Transfer Railway, the Duluth & Iron Range Railroad (D&IR) and Interstate Transfer Railway were added in 1938. All of these had been leased by the DM&N since 1930.

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Front Side: Duluth-Missabe & Iron Range Railroad Back Side: Duluth-Missabe & Iron Range Railroad DM&IR engine #225

Duluth-Missabe & Iron Range Railroad

Item: 25-D     Price: $65.00

Remarks: ca. mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Attractive block lettering and gold patina.

History - continued from above

Today the DM&IR is a railroad operating in northern Minnesota and Wisconsin that hauls iron ore and taconite to the Great Lakes ports of Duluth and Two Harbors, Minnesota. Control of the railway was acquired on May 10, 2004, by the Canadian National Railway when it purchased the assets of Great Lakes Transportation.

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Front Side: Duluth-Missabe & Northern Railroad Back Side: Duluth-Missabe & Northern Railroad DM&N R.R. Flag

Duluth-Missabe & Northern Railway

Item: 26-D     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800's-early 1900's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Ex-fine pocket ware. Block lettering and great gold patina.
Early bird DM&N key!

History

The DM&N was incorporated in 1891 and the first load of iron ore was shipped to Superior, Wisconsin, in October, 1892. The formation of the railway was necessary after the discovery of high-grade Mesabi iron ore near Mountain Iron, Minnesota by the "seven iron men." The DM&N was taken over by "John D. Rockefeller" who sold the railroad to the United States Steel Corporation. The D&IR itself was sold to a steel interest, Illinois Steel,which itself eventually became part of United States Steel resulting in both railroads coming under ownership of the same company. The railroads continued to run independently until the DM&N leased the D&IR in 1930 with both eventually merged in March of 1938 as the Duluth-Missabe & Iron Range Railway.

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Front Side: Duluth-Missabe & Northern Railroad Back Side: Duluth-Missabe & Northern Railroad DM&N R.R. Flag

Duluth-Missabe & Northern Railway

Item: 27-D     Price: $130.00

Remarks: ca. late 1800's-early 1900's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Superb block lettering and patina. Great looking key!

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Front Side: Duluth-South Shore & Atlantic Railroad Back Side: Duluth-South Shore & Atlantic Railroad DSS&A R.R. Flag

Duluth-South Shore & Atlantic Railway

Item: 28-D     Price: $125.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Slaymaker forged.
Excellent serif lettering and copper patina.

History

The Duluth-South Shore & Atlantic Railway (DSS&A) was an American railroad serving the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and the Lake Superior shoreline of Wisconsin. It provided service from Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, and St. Ignace, Michigan, westward through Marquette, Michigan to Superior, Wisconsin, and Duluth, Minnesota. A branchline stretched northward from Nestoria, Michigan up to the Keweenaw Peninsula and terminating at Houghton, Michigan, with two branches extending further to Calumet, Michigan and Lake Linden, Michigan.

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Front Side: Duluth-South Shore & Atlantic Railroad Back Side: Duluth-South Shore & Atlantic Railroad DSS&A Ry.

Duluth-South Shore & Atlantic Railway

Item: 29-D     New Listing     Price: $110.00

Remarks: ca. early-mid 1900's. Slaymaker forged.
Excellent serif lettering and gold patina.

History

The first predecessor of the DSS&A began operations in 1855. The railroad fell under the control of the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) in 1888, and was operated from 1888 until 1960 as an independently nameplated subsidiary of the CPR. In 1949, a reorganization of the DSS&A took place, creating new heralds and designating the company a railroad instead of a railway. In 1961, the DSS&A was folded into the CPR-controlled Soo Line Railroad. Since 2001, the remaining operating trackage of the former DSS&A has been operated by the Canadian National Railway (CN). The original DSS&A trackage still operated is now limited to the areas between Trout Lake and Munising Junction, Ishpeming and Baraga, and White Pine and Marengo Junction.

The original DSS&A trackage still operated is now limited to the areas between Trout Lake and Munising Junction, Ishpeming and Baraga, and White Pine and Marengo Junction.

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Dates quoted for keys are approximate dates. Railroad switch keys initials (reporting mark) are assumed to be correct and accurate.
Comments on any railroad initials origin, including (typos), are welcome. Last update 07/11/2018

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